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Concertgebouw Brugge

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Agenda

From Sun 22.10.17 Vocal
  • A feast of classical music

    Anyone who has attended in recent years will confirm it: this is a veritable feast of classical music. Classical music comes in all shapes and sizes, for every emotion and every occasion: Iedereen Klassiek bathes everyone and everything in a joyful classical-music bath. Together with initiator Klara and many Bruges-based partners, the Concertgebouw is putting together a lavish celebration, with offshoots all over the inner city. As always, we warm up with Crazy about Bach and close with the wonderful Brussels Philharmonic, this time performing some well-known classics. Invite your family and friends to this free event, so that they too can discover the power and beauty of Bach, Beethoven and Bruges.… Read more

  • Bochumer Symphoniker

    A cathedral of sound, that’s the very least one can say about Benjamin Britten’s War Requiem. This large-scale work for two orchestras, two choirs, organ and vocal soloists was performed for the first time at the consecration of the new Coventry Cathedral, built after the original had been destroyed in a World War II bombing raid. With this gigantic ‘sound machine’, Britten generates waves of sound that overwhelm the listener, heightening the effect of the subsequent deeply-touching poetic scenes that turn the listener’s gaze inward. Also deeply affecting is the way Britten intersperses the timeless Latin Requiem Mass with Wilfred Owen’s poignant war poetry. This World-War-I poet-soldier knew like no other how to capture the horrors of the trenches in frank, hard-hitting verse. Poetry that carries the stench of that mud, set in counterpoint to the refined chants of the funeral liturgy: there could be no more heartrending cry for lasting peace!… Read more

  • Britten. War Requiem

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    A cathedral of sound, that’s the very least one can say about Benjamin Britten’s War Requiem. This large-scale work for two orchestras, two choirs, organ and vocal soloists was performed for the first time at the consecration of the new Coventry Cathedral, built after the original had been destroyed in a World War II bombing raid. With this gigantic ‘sound machine’, Britten generates waves of sound that overwhelm the listener, heightening the effect of the subsequent deeply-touching poetic scenes that turn the listener’s gaze inward. Also deeply affecting is the way Britten intersperses the timeless Latin Requiem Mass with Wilfred Owen’s poignant war poetry. This World-War-I poet-soldier knew like no other how to capture the horrors of the trenches in frank, hard-hitting verse. Poetry that carries the stench of that mud, set in counterpoint to the refined chants of the funeral liturgy: there could be no more heartrending cry for lasting peace!… Read more

  • Et exultavit spiritum meum

    Gripping images, alternating moods and perhaps the best-beloved central figure of all time: the Magnificat has it all. The Sixteen select the finest examples of five centuries of choral music, from the magnificent polyphony of Lassus and Victoria to some thoroughly English Magnificats from the 20th century. That the choral tradition across the Channel is still very much alive is proven by a brand new work by young Englishman Thomas Hyde.… Read more

  • Vox Luminis

    Bach’s first Christmas in Leipzig was a weighty responsibility: the new Thomas Cantor had to produce his most impressive music to date. No easy task, because for seven months he had been composing and performing a new cantata every week, sometimes even two. And now at Christmas he had to prove himself in a city that had been left musically hungry by the recent closure of the opera house. Bach acquitted himself magnificently. His Magnificat generates great drama on a compact scale, especially in his later version with festive trumpets. It is now the turn of our new resident artists Vox Luminis to make an impression. They complete the Christmas atmosphere with a Magnificat setting by Kuhnau - a work Bach himself undoubtedly also conducted - and from southern Germany a cantata by Pachelbel, who is nowadays best known for his Canon, but was a highly regarded organist in his day. Performing this evening, without a conductor, Vox Luminis take us deep into the music.… Read more

  • Christmas Concert. Carmina Latina

    When they went to the Americas, the Spaniards and Portuguese brought their own musical traditions with them: polyphony included. Libraries from Peru and Argentina to Mexico filled up with music from both the New and Old Worlds, inspired by the sounds enthusiastic composers heard on the street. This Christmas Leonardo García Alarcón - who can put on a party like no other - selects music that makes the heart beat faster.… Read more

  • Stabat Mater

    With four meditations on death and parting, Vox Luminis and the instrumentalists of L'Acheron touch upon the heart of the Passion. From Jesus' last thoughts, to Mary's disconsolate words at the foot of the Cross, to Buxtehude's personal grief at the loss of his father. Kerll’s requiem also has personal intimacy: after a brilliant career in places such as Brussels, Munich and Vienna, he wrote it with his own death in mind and specifically asked for it to be performed at his own funeral.… Read more

  • Strauss. Till Eulenspiegel

    Richard Strauss was one of the most important composers of the late German Romantic, post-Wagner, and a renowned musical jack-of-all-trades. Navigating his way between artistic conviction and the demands of the music market, he liked to draw his inspiration from the merry-go-round of everyday life. With two symphonic poems and a selection of his incomparable lieder - an intriguing stylistic evolution of more than seven decades - Anima honour an unfettered thinker and wonderful storyteller.… Read more

  • Telemann. Der Tag des Gerichts

    ‘An oratorio full of powerful emotion’, read the announcement in the local newspaper. And indeed, on March 17, 1762, just before Easter, Hamburg discovered this to be true, when it first heard Telemann's Tag des Gerichts, one of his most impressive works. In his latter years, Telemann managed to incorporate the new Classical style into his Baroque music wonderfully well. The lyrical libretto - about the struggle between believers and unbelievers - is highly dramatic and brimming with striking images that are simply crying out for the most beautiful and surprising effects. A work emphatically on the borderline between church and stage. … Read more

  • The Tallis Scholars

    7 a.m., 14 October, 1487: with the church bells still ringing, Jacob Obrecht’s Missa de Sancto Donatiano is sung for the very first time, at the tomb of Donaas de Moor in Bruges’s Sint-Jakobskerk. More than five centuries later, it is still an astonishing masterpiece. With references to his name saint (Donatian), Bruges’s musical traditions and Donaas’s charity towards the city’s poor, the composer very precisely commemorates the life of the deceased. As he also did in his Missa de Sancto Martino, sung by Psallentes on Friday, Obrecht transforms local ingredients into the most universal music. For the opening of this first edition of the festival, The Tallis Scholars perform the Missa de Sancto Donatiano in the place it was first heard . Conductor Peter Phillips sets Obrecht alongside his English contemporaries Browne and Fayrfax – cross-channel commercial contacts were very close - and a wonderful Magnificat, one of the last works by South Fleming Nicolas Gombert.… Read more