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Concertgebouw Brugge

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Agenda

From Fri 03.11.17
  • Open University

    In the 1980s and 1990s Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker, Jan Fabre, Jan Lauwers, Wim Vandekeybus and later also Alain Platel created much talked-about performances. With their new form language, explicit focus on physicality and idiosyncratic approach to language and text, these Flemish Wave choreographers sent a shock wave rippling through the dance landscape. In this Open (University) class the focus is on Jan Fabre, his highly individual vision of the human body and his unusual approach to clichés, stereotypes and icons. … Read more

  • Jan Fabre & Troubleyn

    Just as Fellini made an ode to his city with Roma, so too does Fabre want to bring on ode to his country. He wants to share the crazy fun of our culture with the whole world. It is not the fringes of society that Fabre shows, but the irony, which never becomes cynical. Instead he glorifies the subversive power of our imagination. Belgian Rules / Belgium Rules is Fabre's theatrical 'selfie' of his roots. Musician Raymond van het Groenewoud provides the accompanying songs. Johan de Boose provides the text.… Read more

  • Oorkaan

    What do colours sound like? Who can understand the moon? What does the sun say? Which sounds lower, a double bass or a drum? How many colours does a dream have? Glimpse takes you to an enchanting dream world, in which jazzy sounds and colourful images play an exciting game with each other… and with you. A world in which music, pictures, technology musicians and audience enter into a special friendship.… Read more

  • Oorkaan

    What do colours sound like? Who can understand the moon? What does the sun say? Which sounds lower, a double bass or a drum? How many colours does a dream have? Glimpse takes you to an enchanting dream world, in which jazzy sounds and colourful images play an exciting game with each other… and with you. A world in which music, pictures, technology musicians and audience enter into a special friendship.… Read more

  • In the midst of Antonín Dvořák’s string sextet

    Dancing bows whiz past your ears, plucked strings reverberate right next to your head. You can’t get any closer to musicians than this. The six  musicians’ violins and cellos evoke a Bohemian forest, babbling brooks, frolicking fairies and fiery dancers. A fairy-tale world, brought to life on the spot by illustrator Julie Van Wezemael.  … Read more

  • Oorkaan

    What do colours sound like? Who can understand the moon? What does the sun say? Which sounds lower, a double bass or a drum? How many colours does a dream have? Glimpse takes you to an enchanting dream world, in which jazzy sounds and colourful images play an exciting game with each other… and with you. A world in which music, pictures, technology musicians and audience enter into a special friendship.… Read more

  • Schubert & Dvořák

    Schubert’s String Quintet is a masterpiece of 19th-century chamber music. He composed this emotional piece – which includes a second cello, to enhance its sonority in the low register – two months before his death. But it was only decades later, when listeners recognised the supernatural beauty of its musical lines, that the work got the appreciation it deserved. Fifty years later, Dvořák wrote his exceptionally rich String Sextet. Its compelling Slavic style won’t leave you unmoved.… Read more

  • Photo editing workshop for children

    We start with a series of old photographs. We spray them with aerosols, scratch them, or colour them in with felt-tips or paint. Photos of old gents in smart suits suddenly become marvellous monsters. An elegant lady becomes a fairy. Then it's your turn to take photos, with a Polaroid camera. And you also get to pimp that self-portrait. Transform yourself into a pirate, a monster or a princess. Nothing is impossible.… Read more

  • Telemann. Recorder Sonatas

    In his heyday, Telemann was more famous than Bach. But nowadays? Although he wrote more than 6,000 extremely varied works, Telemann's music is seldom heard. High time then that we turned the spotlight on this Baroque giant, especially in this his anniversary year- he died 250 years ago. In this concert, recorder superstar Erik Bosgraaf and Italian harpsichordist Francesco Corti perform Telemann's Recorder Sonatas: the cheery, ingenious, heart-warming music Telemann used to explore the popular European music styles of his day.… Read more

  • Listening course

    Oratorios, cantatas, arias, Masses: almost half of Johann Sebastian Bach’s compositions are vocal works. Not a note too many, every voice equally interesting: that’s what makes Bach's music so unique. August De Groote scrutinises Bach’s magnificent vocal oeuvre, focussing in particular on Bach's masterly Magnificat. In this commemorative year for the Reformation, he also considers the influence of Lutheran chorales on Bach's work.… Read more

  • Debate about World War I

    In this debate Jörg Monar (DE), rector of the College of Europe, the German ambassador Rüdiger Lüdeking (DE), College of Europe professor Olivier Costa (FR), College student Gavin Dewar (UK) will speak with Standaard journalist Bart Brinckman. The discussion will center on the impact of WW I on today’s political and diplomatic reality. How do politics and diplomacy today reckon with the evolved insights into the strategies that have failed back then. Threaded throughout the conversation will be interventions by two art experts, dr. Jan Christiaens and Senior Full Professor English Literature Marysa Demoor (UGent), who will speak about art influenced by the horror and emotions of the war. They will explore the way artists translated the experiences of WW I into works of art. Their contributions will be illustrated by a fragment from Britten’s War Requiem and some text by the War Poets.… Read more

  • Bochumer Symphoniker

    A cathedral of sound, that’s the very least one can say about Benjamin Britten’s War Requiem. This large-scale work for two orchestras, two choirs, organ and vocal soloists was performed for the first time at the consecration of the new Coventry Cathedral, built after the original had been destroyed in a World War II bombing raid. With this gigantic ‘sound machine’, Britten generates waves of sound that overwhelm the listener, heightening the effect of the subsequent deeply-touching poetic scenes that turn the listener’s gaze inward. Also deeply affecting is the way Britten intersperses the timeless Latin Requiem Mass with Wilfred Owen’s poignant war poetry. This World-War-I poet-soldier knew like no other how to capture the horrors of the trenches in frank, hard-hitting verse. Poetry that carries the stench of that mud, set in counterpoint to the refined chants of the funeral liturgy: there could be no more heartrending cry for lasting peace!… Read more