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Concertgebouw Brugge

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Agenda

From Wed 27.04.16
  • Lecture-performance by Chryssi Dimitriou

    The birth of theatre necessarily entailed the birth of the spectator. What happens when we watch or are being watched? Or when we watch a performer, but see ourselves, as if we are looking into a mirror? In what ways are our understanding, awareness and memory determined by the presence or absence of visual information? In her investigation of the visual aspects of a musical performance, flautist Chryssi Dimitriou searches for an answer to these questions. In this lecture-performance, Dimitriou explores these questions with the help of Salvatore Sciarrino’s flute compositions. The perfect introduction to the Domain Salvatore Sciarrino!… Read more

  • Sciarrino’s Chamber Music

    Like that of Luigi Nono, autodidact Salvatore Sciarrino’s sound idiom had a great impact on a whole generation of composers. Sciarrino plays a surprising game with silence and (ambient) sound; his music is always a real experience. The Aspern Suite is archetypical of his work: pointillist, muted, on the boundaries of the audible and with references to the past. His virtuoso Sei Capricci for violin is reminiscent of Paganini’s virtuoso violin gymnastics. Here too Sciarrino is exploring the outer limits of the performer. Excitement and amazement guaranteed! Sciarrino clearly composes in a mysterious universe, in which music, silence and noise all come together.… Read more

  • Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker / Rosas

    Rainer Marie Rilke’s The Song of the Life and Death of the Cornet, Christoph Rilke inhabits the space between prose and poetry, song and story, man and woman, love and death. Choreographer Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker approaches Rilke’s sensuous fever dream as a musical score: ‘How can you embody language? Dance a story? How can breathing, one of the most elementary patterns of movement, develop into choreography? What happens when you confront the logic of a text with an autonomous logic of movement? Take, for example, Noh-theatre: movement underlines, accentuates or illustrates a story, and yet it maintains its own logic, its own beauty – independent of text or story. In Rilke’s Cornet, I wanted to explore the subtle nuances between breathing, speaking and singing, between the male and the female, the lyrical and the prosaic.’… Read more

  • Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker / Rosas

    Rainer Marie Rilke’s The Song of the Life and Death of the Cornet, Christoph Rilke inhabits the space between prose and poetry, song and story, man and woman, love and death. Choreographer Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker approaches Rilke’s sensuous fever dream as a musical score: ‘How can you embody language? Dance a story? How can breathing, one of the most elementary patterns of movement, develop into choreography? What happens when you confront the logic of a text with an autonomous logic of movement? Take, for example, Noh-theatre: movement underlines, accentuates or illustrates a story, and yet it maintains its own logic, its own beauty – independent of text or story. In Rilke’s Cornet, I wanted to explore the subtle nuances between breathing, speaking and singing, between the male and the female, the lyrical and the prosaic.’… Read more

  • Morgen!

    Sensual love poetry dissolves into devout Marian devotion, voices intertwine with soulful brass, particles of electronically dissected sound disappear into mystical space. Eric Sleichim explores the illuminated music manuscripts of Petrus Alamire, without a doubt one of the richest treasuries of polyphonic music. This concert revolves around the intriguing field of tension between seemingly dissimilar musical worlds: original scores enter into dialogue with modern arrangements. A world premiere by Salvatore Sciarrino and Eric Sleichim’s enigmatic double play for two countertenors and contrabass sax surprise the audience and give the musical discourse a confrontational twist. Thanks to the constantly changing position of the musicians and singers, and their dialogue with electronics and sound spatialisation, this concert become a giant chess game in which devotion and lament are alternated in a strategic ballet. The programme thus intentionally shifts, imperceptibly, between the Renaissance and the 21st century. … Read more

  • Beethoven & Brahms

    Because of their busy solo careers, Arcanto’s four celebrated soloists only play together a few times a year. For the past 12 years they’ve been widely acclaimed as ‘the ultimate super quartet'. Like chameleons, they switch effortlessly between different styles and composers, each time finding the perfect sound idiom. When Jörg Widmann, the great master of the clarinet, comes and joins this foursome, the outcome is certain: this concert will be one of the season’s highlights. Together, they’ll play Brahms’ most beautiful chamber music. In addition to that, they bring us Beethoven’s String Quartet no. 15, with its famous ethereal third movement Heiliger Dankgesang eines Genesenen an die Gottheit (A Convalescent’s Holy Song of Thanksgiving to the Deity), a very compelling adagio. Beethoven wrote this piece after he recovered from a near fatal illness. … Read more

  • The Magic Flute

    Mozart’s Magic Flute, his next-to-last and most famous opera, is often seen as the ideal step up to the genre. It has it all: wonderful catchy melodies, a passionate love story, humour, death and destruction, singing children, audacious virtuosity, wisdom, a fairy-tale quality and, above, the genius of Mozart. In this opera - via a detour into masonic symbolism – Mozart explores human nature. The unpredictability and richness of that nature clearly inspired him to enormous stylistic diversity. Sometimes, Magic Flute sounds simple and folksy; other times, extremely complex. With the Budapest Festival Orchestra as your accomplice, you have the ideal ingredients to make you forget all about everyday life and dream away. And after the performance you’ll walk back into the street with a smile on your face and an aria in your head.… Read more

  • Mozart’ Requiem

    Mozart’s Requiem Mass is undoubtedly one of the highlights of musical history: a meditation on life and death that leaves no one unaffected. Such a gaze into the abyss of the human soul was hitherto unheard of in music. Mozart died before he could finish his overwhelming Requiem. Perhaps the ailing composer felt as if he was composing his own requiem. A few months earlier he had penned another such triumph: his Clarinet Concerto in A. That instrument’s multifaceted timbre and smooth tone inspired Mozart to write some of his most lyrical melodies. As a final testimony to Mozart’s genius, his sublime Requiem and Clarinet Concerto in A make us painfully aware of all the masterpieces Mozart might still have written. What if…?… Read more

  • Mozart’ Requiem

    Mozart’s Requiem Mass is undoubtedly one of the highlights of musical history: a meditation on life and death that leaves no one unaffected. Such a gaze into the abyss of the human soul was hitherto unheard of in music. Mozart died before he could finish his overwhelming Requiem. Perhaps the ailing composer felt as if he was composing his own requiem. A few months earlier he had penned another such triumph: his Clarinet Concerto in A. That instrument’s multifaceted timbre and smooth tone inspired Mozart to write some of his most lyrical melodies. As a final testimony to Mozart’s genius, his sublime Requiem and Clarinet Concerto in A make us painfully aware of all the masterpieces Mozart might still have written. What if…?… Read more

  • The colours of the piano

    Monumental narratives on the piano, or how we can use the black and white keys to conjure up an entire colour palette. Pianist Abdel Rahman El Bacha is a veritable colour magician on the piano. The music of Granados and Ravel fits him like a glove. Both composers transform visual impressions into sound and turn rigid spatial relationships into fluid time sculptures. With Granados that results in a cascade of inspiration, and intricate melodies that keep the pianist’s hands more than busy. In his Miroirs Ravel chooses instead for suggestion, as is evident in the dark, nocturnal atmosphere of Noctuelles, with its rapid flutter of glistening moths. Both Granados and Ravel undoubtedly learned the tricks of their trade from Chopin, whose ability to elicit the most subtle array of tone colours from the black and white keys of the piano is unparalleled. … Read more

  • Lamento

    Crying, whispering, shouting… when everything is at stake, everything is allowed in Baroque. With her sultry, at times even raw voice, full of dark colours, Italian mezzo-soprano Romina Basso sweeps her audience inescapably along into her grief, anger and despair. In this concert she takes on the role of tragic heroines: Luigi Rossi portrays a nameless Queen of Sweden, when she hears about the death of her husband Gustaaf; Giacomo Carissimi gives voice to Mary Stuart, just before Elizabeth I has her beheaded; and saddest of all Arianna, described by Claudio Monteverdi, lonely on Naxos after the sneaky departure of Theseus. These laments and more are framed by chamber music by contemporaries, brilliantly performed by the Greek trio Latinitas Nostra. Pure and poignant.… Read more