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Concertgebouw Brugge

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Agenda

From Fri 15.04.16
  • Mare nostrum

    The shores of the Mediterranean are the cradle of our mythology, philosophy and theology, but also the scene of intense conflict. Invasion and migration still colour the roots and the lives of those who live there. The three great monotheistic religions have also left their imprint. As always, via music, Jordi Savall reveals the links between all those people and cultures. In Mare nostrum he brings oral traditions - Sephardic, Berber, Greek, Arabic, Hebrew, Andalusian and his own Catalan - together with notated music from the Italian trecento and from Ottoman and Greek sources. Expect an eclectic mix of incredible richness, a wealth we can meanwhile also call our own.… Read more

  • Opening film: As I Open My Eyes

    For many years, in Bruges, Cinema Novo was the highlight of the year for lovers of top-quality world-cinema. Since 2013 it has operated under the name ‘MOOOV Film Festival Bruges’ and has spread its activities across the whole of Flanders. MOOOV reaches out to people and touches them, via feature films and documentaries from all over the world. It is now the major film festival in its genre in Flanders, attracting 100,000 visitors a year to its various Flemish locations. The full programme, of some seventy films, will be announced online in the course of March via www.mooov.be. Come to the MOOOV Festival opening film in the Concertgebouw and immediately feel like a film star on the red carpet. Besides the film, you can also enjoy lots of peripheral spectacle and a snack and a drink in an exceptional setting.  … Read more

  • After the Earthquake of Lisbon

    In 1755 what should have been a festive All Saints' Day, turned into a day of disaster: an earthquake, followed by immense tidal waves and raging fires, destroyed almost all of Lisbon. King John V’s fabulous music library also went up in smoke. This catastrophe turned European thinking upside down: so many dead, so much damage… could that really be the will of a good God? In Hamburg Telemann didn’t concern himself with such questions. His evocative Donnerode is both a tribute to his Portuguese colleagues and an acknowledgement of God’s omnipotence. Not coincidentally, he employed the same orchestral configuration Almeida liked to use, in the eight-part Mass Les Muffatti and Vox Luminis perform this evening, for example. Together, these multi-award-winning ensembles give this recently rediscovered gem of the European Baroque added lustre.… Read more

  • The idiosyncratic sound of Rebelo

    Portuguese prodigy João Lourenço Rebelo is perhaps the only composer to attach absolutely no importance to the publication of his works; he left that job to his patron, King John IV of Portugal. Thanks to the Portuguese monarch’s care (and money) Rebelo’s compositions were published in Rome in 1657, and have only thus been preserved for posterity. That they’ve been preserved is fortunate, because in this evening’s Vesper Psalms and Lamentations, Rebelo shows himself to be a highly original and idiosyncratic composer. By blending Venetian double-choir techniques with ‘early’ polyphony and his very personal use of chromatic elements, he gave Portuguese music its own face. His eight-voice lamentations can be counted among the very best of European Holy Week polyphony.… Read more

  • Fado: melancholy reflected in the Tagus

    In the dark and quiet late evening hours, we get to enjoy the authentic fado of the almost eighty-year-old Antonio Rocha - widely renowned as ‘the pope of the fadistas’ - for what may well be the final time. Thanks to his friendship with Paul Van Nevel, Rocha was willing to leave his familiar universe - a street in Lisbon’s Bairro Alto - to sing for us the old fados of the 19th century tradition (not yet mixed with afro, blues and jazz elements), with the inner strength that has helped the Portuguese to survive, And history repeats itself: the Huelgas Ensemble alternate these ‘tears of the Tagus’ with 15th-century Portuguese songs - four centuries older than the fados – which describe the very same thing: the hope of happiness, which the singer already knows will never be attained.… Read more

  • Portuguese kaleidoscope

    ‘A strong personality’, ‘astonishing creativity in his interpretation’ and ‘perfect technical quality’, that’s how Alfred Brendel described pianist Pedro Burmester. Although, like Burmester, he is classically trained, comrade in arms Mário Laginha opts instead for jazz and world music. In 1994 the paths of these two Portuguese pianists cross. The common denominator: their love of adventurous, cross-genre programmes. That is reflected in their programme in Bruges: Ravel’s ‘noble three-step dance’, the apotheosis of the Viennese waltz, alongside sultry work by jazz pianist-composer João Paulo Esteves da Silva. Debussy’s wonderfully dreamy Prélude à l’après midi d’un faune flanking Laginha’s overwhelming Sonata Breve. In short, a veritable kaleidoscope of styles and colours.… Read more

  • Lecture-performance by Chryssi Dimitriou

    The birth of theatre necessarily entailed the birth of the spectator. What happens when we watch or are being watched? Or when we watch a performer, but see ourselves, as if we are looking into a mirror? In what ways are our understanding, awareness and memory determined by the presence or absence of visual information? In her investigation of the visual aspects of a musical performance, flautist Chryssi Dimitriou searches for an answer to these questions. In this lecture-performance, Dimitriou explores these questions with the help of Salvatore Sciarrino’s flute compositions. The perfect introduction to the Domain Salvatore Sciarrino!… Read more

  • Sciarrino’s Chamber Music

    Like that of Luigi Nono, autodidact Salvatore Sciarrino’s sound idiom had a great impact on a whole generation of composers. Sciarrino plays a surprising game with silence and (ambient) sound; his music is always a real experience. The Aspern Suite is archetypical of his work: pointillist, muted, on the boundaries of the audible and with references to the past. His virtuoso Sei Capricci for violin is reminiscent of Paganini’s virtuoso violin gymnastics. Here too Sciarrino is exploring the outer limits of the performer. Excitement and amazement guaranteed! Sciarrino clearly composes in a mysterious universe, in which music, silence and noise all come together.… Read more

  • Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker / Rosas

    Rainer Marie Rilke’s The Song of the Life and Death of the Cornet, Christoph Rilke inhabits the space between prose and poetry, song and story, man and woman, love and death. Choreographer Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker approaches Rilke’s sensuous fever dream as a musical score: ‘How can you embody language? Dance a story? How can breathing, one of the most elementary patterns of movement, develop into choreography? What happens when you confront the logic of a text with an autonomous logic of movement? Take, for example, Noh-theatre: movement underlines, accentuates or illustrates a story, and yet it maintains its own logic, its own beauty – independent of text or story. In Rilke’s Cornet, I wanted to explore the subtle nuances between breathing, speaking and singing, between the male and the female, the lyrical and the prosaic.’… Read more

  • Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker / Rosas

    Rainer Marie Rilke’s The Song of the Life and Death of the Cornet, Christoph Rilke inhabits the space between prose and poetry, song and story, man and woman, love and death. Choreographer Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker approaches Rilke’s sensuous fever dream as a musical score: ‘How can you embody language? Dance a story? How can breathing, one of the most elementary patterns of movement, develop into choreography? What happens when you confront the logic of a text with an autonomous logic of movement? Take, for example, Noh-theatre: movement underlines, accentuates or illustrates a story, and yet it maintains its own logic, its own beauty – independent of text or story. In Rilke’s Cornet, I wanted to explore the subtle nuances between breathing, speaking and singing, between the male and the female, the lyrical and the prosaic.’… Read more

  • Morgen!

    Sensual love poetry dissolves into devout Marian devotion, voices intertwine with soulful brass, particles of electronically dissected sound disappear into mystical space. Eric Sleichim explores the illuminated music manuscripts of Petrus Alamire, without a doubt one of the richest treasuries of polyphonic music. This concert revolves around the intriguing field of tension between seemingly dissimilar musical worlds: original scores enter into dialogue with modern arrangements. A world premiere by Salvatore Sciarrino and Eric Sleichim’s enigmatic double play for two countertenors and contrabass sax surprise the audience and give the musical discourse a confrontational twist. Thanks to the constantly changing position of the musicians and singers, and their dialogue with electronics and sound spatialisation, this concert become a giant chess game in which devotion and lament are alternated in a strategic ballet. The programme thus intentionally shifts, imperceptibly, between the Renaissance and the 21st century. … Read more

  • Beethoven & Brahms

    Because of their busy solo careers, Arcanto’s four celebrated soloists only play together a few times a year. For the past 12 years they’ve been widely acclaimed as ‘the ultimate super quartet'. Like chameleons, they switch effortlessly between different styles and composers, each time finding the perfect sound idiom. When Jörg Widmann, the great master of the clarinet, comes and joins this foursome, the outcome is certain: this concert will be one of the season’s highlights. Together, they’ll play Brahms’ most beautiful chamber music. In addition to that, they bring us Beethoven’s String Quartet no. 15, with its famous ethereal third movement Heiliger Dankgesang eines Genesenen an die Gottheit (A Convalescent’s Holy Song of Thanksgiving to the Deity), a very compelling adagio. Beethoven wrote this piece after he recovered from a near fatal illness. … Read more