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Concertgebouw Brugge

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Agenda

From Sun 09.11.14
  • Alvin Curran’s Inner Cities is a work that appeals to the imagination. It is more than six hours long, ranging from extreme stillness and trancelike minimalism to fascinating free improvisation. After the lecture, Daan Vandewalle performs the work for us. Curran himself does the talking - about the art of slowness, about silence, about his role models John Cage and Frederic Rzewski and about life - and he does it with such conviction that it make us go quiet.… Read more

  • Hans Beckers

    In the hands of Hans Beckers, sand is a musical instrument that lets him play with rhythm and timbre like a weather god. In his sound installation Sonitum Horarium, sand flows from hourglasses through taps and pipettes into dishes and then into bowls on the ground. Microphones amplify the clicks of the apparatus and the rustle of the sand into musical worlds. The row of hourglass machines seem to be counting time. The ‘sand organ’ regulates the sound stream, in a world that is slowly but surely changing.… Read more

  • Sunday

    Who would deny that you have a better chance of achieving quality if you take your time? Isn’t this especially true in art? Thinking, doing, moulding, revising, falling and getting up again. During SLOW (36h), we give you 36 hours to stop and pause. And naturally you only do that for something worthwhile. During SLOW (36h), ‘time’ equals ‘duration’; you decide yourself how much time you want to spend on any particular performance. As composers, such as Morton Feldman and John Cage, and artists, such as Agnes Varda and the Japanese Buddhist monk Enkū, also realised, much can be said with minimal resources. Another strategy of getting to the essence is repetition, as is proven by those mesmerising Gregorian chants and the music of Erik Satie. Whether they come from dancer Marc Vanrunxt, painter Bernard Van Eeghem or avant-garde cult figure Phill Niblock, slowly evolving sounds and images - creation for creation’s sake - massage the senses and, perhaps, even lead to spiritual experiences. What you will take away with you is a powerful and lasting memory.… Read more

  • Peter Jacquemyn

    Enkū was a 17th century wandering, statue-carving Japanese monk. He worked exclusively in wood, from fine sturdy tree-stumps to weathered and decaying scrap wood. He recognised the sculptural potential of every piece of wood. To him carving a Buddha statue was a form of prayer, an ode to the Buddha. Enkū was therefore not bound by the prevailing aesthetic standard. He tried as much as possible to carve while praying. Drawing on a fundamentally Buddhist respect for his surroundings and his raw material, he created various sculptural groups, each severed fragment of which serves as the raw material for new, ever smaller carvings. And thus arose coherent ensembles of a few hundred sculptures. Inspired by this approach, visual artist and musician Peter Jacquemin transformed a cherry tree into an impressive sculptural group. … Read more

  • Architecture installation

    Isn’t it true that architecture is an inherently slow profession? Through thinking, moulding, rethinking, modifying and toil, well-considered choices result in a multiplicity of layers and a wealth of experiences. Via an installation with various time-lapse recordings, we get to explore an architectural gem by Marie-José Van Hee Architects in various scales. A framework of mental calm gives the viewer time to immerse himself or herself gradually in its serene, qualitative spaces.… Read more

  • Metres-long piano strings, stretched through the Atrium and amplified by gigantic, polystyrene sound boxes. When struck, the strings get a vibration that travels along them like a wave, swelling in sound as it goes. Peter Jacquemyn and Jan Pillaert thus create an acoustic soundscape. Long String(s) is transparent; physical movement qualities determine the music, ‘what you see is what you get’.… Read more

  • Maud Bekaert

    ‘Give me a hammer and a chisel, set me behind a block of stone and I find perfect peace. Because you have to let yourself be governed by the speed of the stone. If you carve too quickly, you injure the stone’, says Maud Bekaert, who more than any other has elevated the craft of letter sculpting to an art. As far as she is concerned, letter sculpture is the outstanding example of an art that is based on peace and quiet. During the festival, she will immortalise the motto ‘The slower the experience, the more intense the memory’ in slate.… Read more

  • Triadic Memories

    Deceptive emptiness and bold frugality: Morton Feldman knows how to use the scarcity of ‘action’ in his music to exert a hypnotic effect on the listener. Almost nothing happens, but that nothing is actually a very great deal. Standing still and then progressing, the mystery of Feldman’s music touches upon the mystery of time itself. Pianist Keiko Shichijo plays, while the paintings Bart Vandevijvere made to Triadic Memories are projected.… Read more

  • Johan Huys

    Fast is simple, but going as slowly as possible… well, just try it. Already in the title - a reference to James Joyce’s experimental and hyper-complex Finnegan’s Wake - John Cage is setting the performers a daunting task: depending on its ultimate length, this eight-movement work has almost infinite forms. In Bruges it will be performed three times in Our Lady of the Blind Chapel, at 11 o'clock, 12 o'clock and 13 o'clock, each time in a different tempo.… Read more

  • Johan Huys

    Fast is simple, but going as slowly as possible… well, just try it. Already in the title - a reference to James Joyce’s experimental and hyper-complex Finnegan’s Wake - John Cage is setting the performers a daunting task: depending on its ultimate length, this eight-movement work has almost infinite forms. In Bruges it will be performed three times in Our Lady of the Blind Chapel, each time in a different tempo.… Read more

  • Johan Huys

    Fast is simple, but going as slowly as possible… well, just try it. Already in the title - a reference to James Joyce’s experimental and hyper-complex Finnegan’s Wake - John Cage is setting the performers a daunting task: depending on its ultimate length, this eight-movement work has almost infinite forms. In Bruges it will be performed three times in Our Lady of the Blind Chapel, each time in a different tempo.… Read more

  • Daan Vandewalle

    Alvin Curran’s monumental Inner Cities is a compelling journey through this American composer’s rich inner life: full of memories, musical asides and odes to exotic places and people. Along the way Currans' equally rich and colourful musical ideas unfold: from extreme tranquillity and trancelike minimalistic gems to fascinating free improvisation. Pianist Daan Vandewalle carries us expertly through this more than six-hour-long magnum opus.… Read more

  • Patterns in a Chromatic Field

    Music like the intricate patterns of oriental carpets. In his Patterns in a Chromatic Field, Morton Feldman weaves a hallucinatory sound carpet that is never predictable and always arouses curiosity. Everything revolves around the hushed meeting of the two protagonists: the cello (Arne Deforce) and the piano (Yutaka Oya). Visual Kitchen translate this encounter visually. It is minimal, meditative and highly addictive.… Read more

  • Marc Vanrunxt & Katleen Vinck

    The monumental performance space and the body sculptures of dancer-choreographer Marc Vanrunxt interact, attracting and repelling each other. Images of loneliness, fragmentation and infinity loom. A landscape is created that presents itself as a residue of times gone by, a nostalgic bastion of oblivion. The soundscape is Disintegration Loops I-IV by American composer William Basinski.… Read more